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Have you been a victim? Or have you contributed to your own stigma?

by MoodyVic » Sun Sep 18, 2016 5:13 pm

I recently got a job as a web developer at a world class hospital. Part of the the interview process was to take a physical. I was stupid enough to put down that I was diabetic and controlling that with diet and I was Bipolar and using a therapist to manage that. I am a 50 year old fat man and I have all the ailment that I deserve: High BP, collateral, and so on. I was not too concerned because this was a desk job.

The reason I was not under a doctor's care because I took a temp to hire job and the agency I used had an insurance called "Benefits in a Card" -- no joke. Well the insurance was a joke but that is the topic for another topic.

The only reason I was almost not hired was that I am not under a doctor's care for my Bipolar Disorder. This made me mad to no end. I have a real disorder and it was being managed well with therapy, and a healthcare "professional" did not question the fact that my glucose was high, that I have other problems.

Calmer heads prevailed and I am here to tell you that it did take me standing up for myself. There are many people that sincerely have never heard of serotonin. I do not fault them because they have a job to do, and they do it to the best of their ability.

Yes there sill is a stigma, I pray that anyone reading this has to opportunity and confidence to turn incidences of stigma into chances to educate.

Moody
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by jeffw » Sun Sep 18, 2016 5:27 pm

Way to go MoodyVic! Good positive experience!
The 1,000 mile journey begins with the 1st step.
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by hal » Sun Sep 18, 2016 8:04 pm

Vic, here's something to think about:
You seem to be saying you don't need a pdoc (psychiatrist).
Would you so casually say you don't need an M.D. for your diabetes?

Your BP symptoms come because, like the rest of us here, you have a scrambled-up brain. You need to see an M.D., a psychiatrist, about it.
. . . all times I have enjoyed
Greatly, have suffered greatly, both with those
That loved me, and alone.
-- Tennyson
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by Mocha » Sun Sep 18, 2016 8:41 pm

We've talked about this here many times......there's a lot of Stigma in the medical profession, especially in the mental health field. Don't know why, just is.

Many of our members don't tell their employers.

And btw......you told me in an earlier post that you had a pdoc, and here you say you don't. Which is it?

Not A Professional of Any Kind ~ Just Your Garden Variety Nutjob

The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.

~Martin Luther King~
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by MoodyVic » Mon Sep 19, 2016 1:58 am

Hi,

I just wanted to set the record straight. Pdocs are DEFINITELY a good thing. I had a 3 month period in my life that I had to do without one. I managed by the grace of God, but it was not a comfortable or healthy thing to do.

As I understand bipolar it is a physical disorder in the sense that real chemicals are not being right in my brain. I am no doctor, so I will stop there, but medicines are a crucial part of my support system.

I hear what you are saying about physiotherapy, and I have that support too. 4 months ago I started working for the Cleveland Clinic. They have awesome insurance, so I can get help.

For me a strong faith has helped too. I try not to get too churchy on people, because I know this is a sensitive topic. I was diagnosed on October 26th 1992. I was arrested put in the community supported psych ward, and that was the worst place I have ever been. I hear jail is worse and i believe it.
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